The Gulf Intelligence
 
NEWS HIGHLIGHT:
Exclusive: Taiwan president says phone call with Trump can take place again ... Trump tells Canada, Mexico, he won't terminate NAFTA treaty yet: White House ... Trump's plan to slash business taxes seen as 'guidepost' by congressional Republicans ... Israel strikes Iran-supplied arms depot near Damascus airport ... China welcomes U.S. saying it's open to talks on North Korea ... Ford first quarter profit beats estimates, reiterates 2017 profit outlook ... Asylum-seekers fleeing U.S. may find cold comfort in Canada’s courts ... Difficult legal path forward for Trump in sanctuary cities case ... Le Pen, Macron spar as French presidential race narrows slightly ... Arkansas plans fourth execution in about a week ...
Where am I? bullet

IEA finds CO2 emissions flat for third straight year even as global economy grew in 2016


20/03/2017
By:International Energy Agency

Global energy-related carbon dioxide emissions were flat for a third straight year in 2016 even as the global economy grew, according to the International Energy Agency, signaling a continuing decoupling of emissions and economic activity. This was the result of growing renewable power generation, switches from coal to natural gas, improvements in energy efficiency, as well as structural changes in the global economy.

Global emissions from the energy sector stood at 32.1 gigatonnes last year, the same as the previous two years, while the global economy grew 3.1%, according to estimates from the IEA. Carbon dioxide emissions declined in the United States and China, the world’s two-largest energy users and emitters, and were stable in Europe, offsetting increases in most of the rest of the world.

The biggest drop came from the United States, where carbon dioxide emissions fell 3%, or 160 million tonnes, while the economy grew by 1.6%. The decline was driven by a surge in shale gas supplies and more attractive renewable power that displaced coal. Emissions in the United States last year were at their lowest level since 1992, a period during which the economy grew by 80%.

“These three years of flat emissions in a growing global economy signal an emerging trend and that is certainly a cause for optimism, even if it is too soon to say that global emissions have definitely peaked,” said Dr Fatih Birol, the IEA’s executive director. “They are also a sign that market dynamics and technological improvements matter. This is especially true in the United States, where abundant shale gas supplies have become a cheap power source.”

 

CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPORT 

Last Update: 20/03/2017

Post a Comment:

Name
 
Email
   
Comment Title
 
Comments